Musician, Alariwo of Africa shares scary photo of a commercial plane’s tyre in Nigeria

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According to the crossover king, Alariwo of Africa, ‘do we need to start looking at tyres now before we board a plane in Nigeria? This is the tyre of a plane and passengers are ready for boarding…This na One of the reasons why I never fly locally..It’s all about money and not about the safety of the people’.

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Corruption threatens Nigeria and its election – President Buhari says in new article

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Read a new article wrtten by President Buhari below

On February 16th, Nigeria will hold a general election. Four years ago, the country experienced its first democratic transfer of power to the opposition since 1999. The vote in a few days will be no less significant.

As president, I have tried to judiciously exercise the trust vested in me to combat the problems of corruption, insecurity and an inequitable economy. All are important. But amongst them, one stands above the others as both a cause and aggravator of the rest. It is, of course, corruption.

A policy programme that does not have fighting corruption at its core is destined to fail. The battle against graft must be the base on which we secure the country, build our economy, provide decent infrastructure and educate the next generation.

This is the challenge of our generation: the variable on which our success as a nation shall be determined. But the vested interests at play can make this fight difficult. By way of their looting, the corrupt have powerful resources at their disposal. And they will use them. For when you fight corruption, you can be sure it will fight back.

It even threatens to undermine February’s poll and – by extension – our democracy. The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission has raised concerns over laundered money being funnelled into vote buying. This is the problem of corruption writ large. It illustrates how it lurks in all and every crevice of public life, manipulating due process in pursuit of self-preservation and perpetuation; protecting personal political and economic interests at the expense of the common good.

Indeed, those who have criticised my administration’s anti-corruption drive are those who oppose its mission. And though their lawyers may craft expensive alibis, they cannot escape that which binds them together: a raft of documents and barely legal (some clearly illegal) mechanisms – whether that be the Panama Papers, US Congress reports, shell companies or offshore bank accounts.

Corruption corrodes the trust on which the idea of community is founded, because one rule for the few and another for everyone else is unacceptable to anyone working honestly.

But as we have intensified our war on corruption, so we have found that corruption innovates to resist the law. This is not the sole domain of those Nigerians, but the international corruption industry: the unsavoury fellow-traveler of globalisation.

Once the enablers are let in – as they have been in the past – the greed of those they collude with grows. We have closed the door on them, but unfortunately there still remain individuals who are willing to open windows.

Concrete progress has been made, but there is still much to do. We have repatriated hundreds of millions of dollars stowed away in foreign banks. These funds have been transparently deployed on infrastructural projects and used to directly empower the poorest in society. More is still to come from our international partners in France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Yet the hundreds of billions sifted out of the country for the best part of this century promise more.

We have secured high profile convictions, but greater cases remain. Lawyers table endless objections to obstruct court proceedings, whilst their clients hope it lasts until a ‘friendly’ president is voted into office. We must continue to tighten the legal framework and ensure the authorities have the investigative powers at their disposal to secure sentences. Only then will we begin to neutralise the advantages the corrupt have.

More ghost workers must be removed from government payroll (almost $550 million has been saved from identifying phantom employees). More can be recovered through our whistle-blower policy ($370 million has been returned since its launch in 2016). More is still to come. But, together, we shall prevail over corruption.

A Yoruba proverb states that only the patient one can milk a lion. Likewise, victory over corruption is difficult, but not impossible. We must not flounder in our resolve. I know many Nigerians would like to see faster action. So do I. But so too must we follow due process and exercise restraint, ensuring allegation never takes the place of evidence. For that is not the Nigeria we should wish to build.

There is no doubt that this Administration has changed the way we tackle corruption. The choice before voters is this: Do we continue forward on this testing path against corruption? Or do revert to the past, resigned to the falsehood that it is just the-way-things-are-done? Or that it is just too difficult – too pervasive – to fix? I know which one I would choose. It is why I am asking Nigerians for another four years to serve them.
MUHAMMADU BUHARI,
PRESIDENT,
FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA

Prostitution is paid rape- US feminist, Laila Mickelwait says

 

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US-based feminist, Laila Mickelwest, is of the opinion that ‘Prostitution is paid rape’.

She went on to say, ‘If prostitution were not a form of sex inequality than we would see males prostituted at the same rate as females & we would see females buying sex at the same rate as males. The numbers aren’t even remotely close. Women are sold to men that’s how the industry operates’.

Prostitution is paid rape- US feminist, Laila Mickelwait says

 

Prostitution is paid rape- US feminist, Laila Mickelwait says

‘Its six days to polls and many parties are yet to submit polling agents list’ – INEC issues last warning

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The Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) has directed all political parties participating in the forthcoming general elections to complete the processes for the submission of the names of their polling agents by Monday. February 11th.

 

The commission gave the directive in a statement issued by Mr Festus Okoye, INEC National Commissioner, and Chairman, Information and Voter Education Committee, on Saturday in Abuja.

 

Okoye explained that INEC in its Timetable and Schedule of Activities for 2019 General Elections had fixed Feb. 1, as the last date for the submission of the name, two passport photographs of each polling agent and sample signature for the Presidential and National Assembly Elections scheduled for Feb. 16.

 

Okoye said that the commission at its meeting with all Resident Electoral Commissioners (RECs) in Abuja on Friday reviewed its state of readiness for the general elections, the national and state elections, scheduled for Feb. 16 and March 2. Okoye said that at the end of the meeting, the commission expressed concern that a week after the deadline for the submission of the list of poll agents for Presidential and National Assembly elections only few parties had completed the submission of the names of polling agents.

 

He added that in less than three weeks to the deadline for the submission of the list of candidates for the Governorship and State Assembly elections, only few political parties had complied with the extant provisions of the law.

“Most of the lists submitted are not accompanied by the photographs and specimen signatures of the poll/party agents as required by law.

“The Commission has decided as follows: All political parties that submitted incomplete applications without the specimen signatures and photographs of the poll/party agents are strongly requested to regularize this on or before close of work on Monday the Feb. 11.

“All political parties are reminded that Feb. 16, is the last day for the submission of the names, photographs and specimen signatures of poll/party agents for the Governorship, State Assembly and Area Council elections.

“Any list of poll/party agents that is not accompanied by specimen signatures and photographs of poll/party agents will be rejected.

“It is unlawful for political parties to deploy poll/party agents whose names have not been forwarded to the Commission and duly accredited in accordance with the law.

“The security agents have been so informed and no recognition, right or privilege will be accorded to anyone not accredited by the Commission,” he said.

 

He said that at the end of the meeting, the Commission decided to draw the attention of the registered political parties and members of the public to the provisions of the law regarding the submission of names of polling/party agents by political parties.

“Section 45 (1) of the Electoral Act 2010 (as amended) provides that:
Each political party may, by notice in writing addressed to the Electoral Officer of the Local Government Area or Area Council, appoint a polling agent for each polling unit and collation centre in the Local Government Area or Area Council for which it has a candidate and the notice, which sets out the name and address of the polling agent shall be accompanied by two passport photographs of each polling agent and sample signature of the polling agent and be given to the Electoral Officer at least 14 days before the date fixed for the election.

“Provided that no person presently serving as Chairman or member of a Local Government or Area Council, Commissioner of a State, Deputy Governor, or Governor of a State, Minister or any other person holding political office under any tier of Government and who has not resigned his appointment at least three months before the election shall serve as a polling agent of any political party, either at the polling unit or at any centre designated for collation of results of election,” he said.

#UFC234: Nigerian fighter, Isreal Adesanya defeats his mentor, Anderson Silva

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Last night, Nigeria’s Israel Adesanya remained unbeaten in the octagon after he beat middleweight legend, Anderson Silva, in the main event at UFC 234 in Melbourne, Australia.

 

Silva’s fight with Israel Adesanya was bumped up to the main event earlier in the day when the originally scheduled bout between middleweight champ Robert Whittaker and challenger Kelvin Gastelum was canceled when the champion suffered a hernia.

 

Put into the main-event spot, the duo dazzled in a bout filled with flashy strikes, head games, and near knockouts that barely missed. And while Silva had more than his fair share of moments, Adesanya is the one in his prime. And that showed as the bout wore on.

 

Adesanya was faster and simply landed the bigger shots as he went on to a unanimous decision victory at Melbourne’s Rod Laver Arena. The judges’ scores were 29-28 and a pair of 30-27s for the victor.

Photos: INEC office in Plateau set ablaze by drunk security officer, PVCs and other items burnt

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INEC office in Quan Pan local government area of Plateau state is currently on fire.

According to journalist Bello Lukman, the fire was caused by a drunken security man . Ballot boxes, voters register, uncollected Permanent Voters Card,Card Readers and other materials got burnt.

 

Photos: INEC office in Plateau set ablaze by drunk security officer, PVCs and other items burntPhotos: INEC office in Plateau set ablaze by drunk security officer, PVCs and other items burntPhotos: INEC office in Plateau set ablaze by drunk security officer, PVCs and other items burntPhotos: INEC office in Plateau set ablaze by drunk security officer, PVCs and other items burnt